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fujilla
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on: June 26, 2011, 10:41:49 AM

At 38 I decided to return to study and enrolled in a Web Design & Development (BSc) degree last September.

My background was not in the Web industry, nor in depth programming really.  A previous role in IT for 5 years involved using Cobol for data manipulation, however that was about it.

Due to the amount of self learning one has to do at University, I decided to try and learn Objective-C, as well as the other bits and pieces that make up developing applications for iOS devices.  I have always been a fan of Apple, and have worked on Apple Macintosh Plus and SE machines.  I have had an iPhone since the first day they hit the streets here in the UK, am currently on a 3G, and hoping to upgrade to the next version (hopefully in a couple of months if it is released then).

I have been on blogs where people suggest you learn C before moving Objective-C, however after reading the intro to Steve's book where he says you don't necessarily need to have knowledge of C, or even a programming language for him to teach you, I decided to purchase his book, and have recently taken delivery of the 3rd edition and have just finished Chapter 4.

As I am on my summer break for University at the moment I intend on spending a large chunk of my time learning Objective-C as well as the Cocoa Touch/Xcode side, so hopefully by the end of the summer I will have a reasonable grasp on things.

I must say I am finding the basics of Objective-C OK, and have a reasonable handle on looping and decision making through learning basic Javascript at University, however when you start working through the dedicated iOS/iPhone books out there it all becomes a little bit scary.  The scariest thing for me so far is how you build table view apps, and all the different statements that go with it.  I sometimes think "how does one remember all of this", but then maybe I am trying to run before I can walk.

Anyway, I have set up a blog for those interested which I intend on using to document my journey, to hopefully getting an app in the app store by this time next year.  You can view it at http://myfirstiphoneapp.co.uk.

So that is my story so far, anyone else care to join in?

Cheers,
Nick
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briomusic
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Reply #1 on: July 02, 2011, 01:38:26 PM

Hi Nick,

I am also going back to studying - albeit by myself for the time being - after a good few years working (music production in my case). My only background is using BASIC on a home computer about 25 years ago...so that helped understanding looping/decisions etc. But the whole concept of objects and classes was completely baffling to me and is only now starting to slowly sink in!

I have bought a few books and checked a few blogs and online tutorials, with not much success, the two main reasons being:
1. a knowledge of C was expected (I don't have any)
2. everything was based on xcode 3 (I have xcode 4 installed)
I feel like I am only really getting started now that Steve's book has arrived in the post, everything works as expected, the exercises are actually do-able with what has been learned in the preceding chapter.

I have also had a 'run-before-walk experience' with some of the 'iphone for beginners' books that just make you blindly copy code without having any real understanding of what's going on. As you know Steve's book is not at all like this and so far I have no problems taking in the information at quite a fast pace. This might be due to bits and pieces already memorized from other books, which now fall into place. We'll see how I get on once completely new concepts are introduced. Roll Eyes

As for the massive amount of info to retain - I suspect that many programmers just copy/paste bits of code from various sources, I guess it's knowing which bits to change/customise that let's you get away with it  Wink

However, I want to hold off on that until I have finished Steve's book.

Thanks for posting your blog, I'll have a look at that.
Cheers
Brio
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Dags
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Reply #2 on: July 04, 2011, 06:58:39 AM

I'm also about to embark on a new journey.

I've spent the past 10 years working as an IT Consultant, developing in a proprietary programming language. Lately it has become apparent that I cater for a very niche market and my job isn't completely secure, so I'm looking to pick up some new skills. Mobile phone apps appealed to me, and as I own an iPhone that seemed the obvious route.

The language I use in my day job is OO based, and so hopefully Objective-C shouldn't be too alien to me. I opted for Stephen's book based on reviews alone - hopefully previous readers haven't let me down! The book arrived today, and so I thought I'd join this community in an attempt to spur me on; turning up at the same time as the good weather is a testing start!
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fujilla
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Reply #3 on: July 06, 2011, 07:26:22 AM

Hi Brio,

I'm sure that other iOS developers copy code, and if written correctly that is a benefit of an OOP language (reusable code).

I know what you mean regarding the iOS programming books being based on Xcode 3.  There is a new book out now (in the US anyway) iOS Programming by Joe Conway and Aaron Hillegass which is an update to iPhone Programming and uses Xcode 4.  I am still waiting my copy however as I am in the UK.

I have managed to get through the majority of sections of the Xcode 3 books, all be it revisiting some chapters a couple of times.

And as you say, you come across subject areas in Steve's books which you have seen in other books and it now makes sense.

Good luck with the learning,
Nick
http://myfirstiphoneapp.co.uk
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fujilla
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Reply #4 on: July 06, 2011, 07:29:00 AM

Hi Dags,

I am sure that the book won't let you down, even if your day job is using an OOP language.

Good luck with your learning,
Nick
http://myfirstiphoneapp.co.uk
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Lange0716
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Reply #5 on: July 11, 2011, 08:01:09 PM

I've just started Stephens Programming in Objective-C, i've just finished chapter 2. I studied a little with the C language and i have a base knowledge of the language, and i understand all the terms in Objective-C, what methods are used for, variables and so on, i just don't know how exactly to use them in order to compile. Does anyone know an easy way to know how to use them? Thanks
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Ryvoxe
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Reply #6 on: July 11, 2011, 08:17:56 PM

I ordered Steve's book today and it should arrive tomorrow. I've already read quite a bit of it through the sample pages amazon provided, and I'm really liking Steve's style. I'd love to follow you on your journey to make your first iphone app. I may do the same thing as I make my first mac app.

Good luck!
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fujilla
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Reply #7 on: July 12, 2011, 01:15:38 AM

Hi Lange0716,

With regards to using the various statements in Objective-C in order to get them to compile, the advice I would give you at this stage is keep going with the book.  As you have finished Chapter 2, you have Classes, Objects and Methods in Chapter 3 which should help a lot.

Of course, If things are still not going in the right direction for you then ask questions on this forum.

Good luck,
Nick
http://myfirstiphoneapp.co.uk
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fujilla
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Reply #8 on: July 12, 2011, 01:17:35 AM

Hi Ryvoxe,

Good luck with your journey to developing a mac app.

The blog/website idea is good as it documents your learning, and as well as helping others, you can also look back on it yourself as a reference guide.

Cheers,
Nick
http://myfirstiphoneapp.co.uk
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jtcdesigns
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Reply #9 on: July 22, 2011, 10:24:57 AM

Insanely excited to start Objective-C. I'm an IT guy and do web development at work. Lately had to teach myself javascript for certain project and as I don't know much I mastered the art of googling code and applying it where needed. That method has helped me get out of a lot of pinches but not ever recommended to anyone. I did however learn a lot from it and managed to write my own code for a project. As the iphone keeps accelerating I feel left out and I always like knowing how things work. I've reviewed many books on iphone development but they all start off with assuming you know objective-C and paste up code randomly expecting you know it... its even worse when they say its for beginners.. but the catch is.... beginner iphone dev.. not beginner to objective-C. Anyways, I read the intro and was pretty much estatic to know you are going based on no knowledge of the coding so I'm looking forward to this as I just started reading today and currently downloading the latest xcode. Its annoying when you go through a book and things just don't work and you followed things exactly, can't wait to start this.
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skochan
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Reply #10 on: July 22, 2011, 03:54:45 PM

Best of luck.   We're here at the forum to help.

Cheers,

Steve Kochan
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dsco
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Reply #11 on: July 28, 2011, 04:44:02 AM

I too am an ex IT guy ( way ex) cobol, pl/i, ims etc ...oop was a mystery that is slowly unravelling thanks to Steve's book ..just at Chapt 7 but starting to get a feel for classes, objects methods etc...getting way ahead I'm wondering when you finally get a working app how do you move 'object code' ( compiled version?) from Xcode to Applications (?) for example so it is available for use .....
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mercee
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Reply #12 on: August 13, 2011, 01:38:22 PM

Hi Guys,

i am new to this forum and also new to programming. tell you the truth i never programmed before (no programming experience )and back then (around 10 years) i hated it, it just didn't seem fun.
now since i own a Mac book pro, iPhone, iPad and after looking into some tutorials, books and online docs i finally found interest in programming :-).

i recently purchased the book "Programming in objective c by Stephen Kochan" and "cocoa programming in Mac OSX by Aaron Hillegass" so now i am ready to go.

@Nick... you have a great blog thanks for that.

just one question to all... how is your learning structure? example one chapter a day? hour or two a day?

would be great if someone can give me some tips

Regards
Cervantes

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fujilla
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Reply #13 on: August 13, 2011, 02:09:25 PM

Hi Cervantes,

Welcome to the forum, and to the world of Objective-C/iOS Programming.

Regarding the learning structure, I would say there is now hard and fast rule - just put as much time as you can into it.

iOS programming has a pretty steep learning curve, so don't feel frustrated when you first start out (as I did, and guess sometimes still do).

I am on my summer break from University at the moment so spend a good part of my week between doing this and riding my bike (you really need some "me" time or you will go mad).

Good luck, and don't be afraid to ask questions, no matter how trivial they may seem.

Nick
http://myfirstiphoneapp.co.uk

BTW - Thanks for the comment on my blog.
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mercee
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Reply #14 on: August 13, 2011, 02:46:57 PM

Hi Nick,

thanks a lot for your reply and i will do so.  Grin

Regards,
Cervantes
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